Improved artificial urinary sphincter outcomes using a transcorporal cuff placement in patients with a “fragile urethra”

  • Elaine Redmond
  • Steven Tong Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta
  • Logan Zemp Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta
  • Nathan Hoy Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta
  • Keith F. Rourke Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta
Keywords: transcorporal, artificial urinary sphincter, fragile urethra,

Abstract

Introduction: The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) is the most effective treatment option for incontinence after prostate cancer treatment. However, patients with a “fragile urethra” (defined as prior radiotherapy, previous failed AUS, or previous urethroplasty) are at increased risk of AUS failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes using standard and transcorporal cuff placement in this group of patients.

Methods: A retrospective review was performed on patients with a fragile urethra who underwent AUS insertion between 2004 and 2017. The primary outcome was the need for AUS revision. Secondary outcome measures included change in pad use, patient satisfaction, continence (≤1 pad/day), improvement (≥50% change in pad use), and cuff erosion rates.

Results: Seventy-six patients met the criteria for inclusion, with a mean age of 71.6 years and a mean followup of 37.9 months. A total of 42.1% had prior radiotherapy, 56.6% had a history of failed AUS, and 19.7% had previous urethroplasty. Transcorporal cuff placement was performed in 31.6% (n=24). These patients had lower revision (20.8% vs. 36.5%; p=0.05) and erosion rates (8.3% vs. 17.3%; p=0.09). There was no significant difference in functional outcomes such as continence (66.7% vs. 73.1%; p=0.57), improvement (100% vs. 90.4%;p=0.17), or satisfaction (82.6% vs. 69.4%; p=0.26), nor for 90-day complications (4.2% vs. 9.6%; p=0.41).

Conclusions: AUS insertion is an effective treatment option for post-prostatectomy incontinence in the setting of a fragile urethra. Transcorporal cuff placement in this subset of patients may be recommended, as it is associated with lower revision and erosion rates compared to standard cuff placement.

Published
2020-06-16
How to Cite
Redmond, E., Tong, S., Zemp, L., Hoy, N., & Rourke, K. F. (2020). Improved artificial urinary sphincter outcomes using a transcorporal cuff placement in patients with a “fragile urethra”. Canadian Urological Association Journal, 14(12), E621-4. https://doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.6431
Section
Original Research