A 12-month feasibility study to investigate the effectiveness of cryogen-cooled monopolar radiofrequency treatment for female stress urinary incontinence

  • Bruce B. Allan Allan Centre
  • Stacie Bell
  • Kathryn Husarek
Keywords: cryogen-cooled monopolar radiofrequency (CMRF), female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), early feasibility study

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this early feasibility study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a non-ablative, cryogen-cooled, monopolar radiofrequency (CMRF) treatment for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI).

Methods: Subjects meeting all the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled and randomized into two groups. Subjects in group 1 received one CMRF treatment and subjects in group 2 received two CMRF treatments six weeks apart. Followup visits were performed at one, four, six, and 12 months post-treatment. At each study visit, subjects performed an objective, standardized one-hour pad weight test and completed several patient-reported outcome measures, a seven-day bladder voiding diary, and safety assessments.

Results: Data indicate an improvement in SUI symptoms and quality of life for subjects, as determined by validated SUI-related patient-reported outcomes and the objective one-hour pad weight test, with a >50% reduction in pad weight from baseline for 52% of the subjects at 12 months. In addition to efficacy, the CMRF treatment was well-tolerated and safe.

Conclusions: The outcome measures evaluated indicate an improvement in SUI symptoms and quality of life. The sustained benefit of the CMRF vaginal treatment at 12 months suggests potential use as an office-based, non-surgical approach to treat mild to moderate SUI.

Published
2020-02-04
How to Cite
Allan, B. B., Bell, S., & Husarek, K. (2020). A 12-month feasibility study to investigate the effectiveness of cryogen-cooled monopolar radiofrequency treatment for female stress urinary incontinence. Canadian Urological Association Journal, 14(7), E313-8. https://doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.6145
Section
Original Research