How far are they coming from?

Distance travelled for urological pediatric appointment

  • Samuel Otis-Chapados Division of Urology, Department of Surgery CHU de Québec – Université Laval, Québec, Canada
  • Karolane Coderre Division of Urology, Department of Surgery CHU de Québec – Université Laval, Québec, Canada
  • Stéphane Bolduc Division of Urology, Department of Surgery CHU de Québec – Université Laval, Québec, Canada
  • Katherine Moore Division of Urology, CHU de Québec, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada
Keywords: distance travelled, urological pediatric consultation, communications, kilometers

Abstract

Introduction: In the province of Quebec, eight pediatric urologists practice in three tertiary centres covering large territories. To improve the availability of pediatric urology to distant families and to reduce the economic burden on them, we examined the chart of all patients attending the pediatric urological outpatient clinic. Our objectives were to evaluate the distance travelled by each urological pediatric outpatient and to report the most frequent urological referral complains.

Methods: From July 2016 to June 2017, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of all the 3609 pediatric patients seen in the outpatient urological clinic in CHU de Québec. We specifically focused on the travelling distance covered by families and the purpose of referral.

Results: Most patients were boys (78%) and the mean age was 7.2 years. The average one-way distance traveled by each family was 69 km. The patients came more frequently from Capitale-Nationale (63,7%) and Chaudière-Appalaches (21,9%), the closest regions. The most common reasons for consultations were postoperative followups (15%), phimosis and adherences (14%), enuresia (14%), hydronephrosis (13%), micturition disorder (11%), and cryptorchidism and retractile testicles (8%). Of all patients seen for phimosis or cryptorchidism, only 24% and 36% of them, respectively, were scheduled for surgery.

Conclusions: Phimosis, cryptorchidism, and voiding disorders are the most frequent pediatric urological reasons for consultation; primary care continuing medical education seems worthwhile. It would, perhaps, be more beneficial for all to have the pediatric urologists travelling to perform clinics and surgeries in distant regions to save more than 300 km round trip to several families.

Published
2019-02-22
How to Cite
Otis-Chapados, S., Coderre, K., Bolduc, S., & Moore, K. (2019). How far are they coming from? Distance travelled for urological pediatric appointment. Canadian Urological Association Journal, 13(12). https://doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.5892
Section
Original Research