Effects of desmopressin for the treatment of nocturnal polyuria in elderly women: impact on related sleep quality

  • Sun-Ouck Kim
  • Ho Song Yu
  • Ho Suck Chung
  • Dongdeuk Kwon
Keywords: nocturia, sleep, quality of life, women

Abstract

Introduction: We investigated the efficacy, safety, and impact of desmopressin on quality of sleep in treating nocturnal polyuria in elderly women.

Methods: We recruited 60 women over 60 years old with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), including nocturia, and with nocturnal polyuria. Nocturnal polyuria was defined as nighttime urine production exceeding 33% of the 24-hour total urine volume determined by a frequency volume (FV) chart. All patients failed to respond to treatment of their underlying disease and evening fluid restriction. Desmopressin 0.1 mg was administered orally at bedtime for 12 weeks. The participants completed a series of questionnaires on the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) sleep scale and FV chart before and after treatment.

Results: The patient population had a mean age of 69.2 ± 9.4 years (range: 61–81). The mean duration of symptoms was 61.2 ± 45.1 months. Significant decreases were evident after desmopressin treatment in the number of nocturia episodes (3.63 ± 1.61 to 2.00 ± 1.13, p = 0.01), nocturnal urine volume (p = 0.01), nocturnal polyuria index (NPI) (p = 0.01), and nocturia index (NI) p = 0.01). Among the categories of the MOS sleep scale, sleep index (p = 0.003), sleep disturbance (p = 0.001), snoring (p = 0.028), and shortness of breath (p = 0.036) significantly changed, with a decreased number of nocturia episodes. Adverse events were mild.

Conclusions: Desmopressin is an effective treatment for nocturnal polyuria in elderly women, where conservative treatment has failed. Sleep quality is also improved.

Published
2015-11-04
How to Cite
Kim, S.-O., Yu, H. S., Chung, H. S., & Kwon, D. (2015). Effects of desmopressin for the treatment of nocturnal polyuria in elderly women: impact on related sleep quality. Canadian Urological Association Journal, 9(11-12), E770-4. https://doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.3097
Section
Original Research