Pediatric procedures in urology residency training: An analysis of the experience of Canadian urology residents

  • Paul Gustafson University of British Columbia
  • Andrew MacNeily University of British Columbia
Keywords: pediatrics, competency, t-res

Abstract

Introduction: We sought to determine if the exposure to pediatric urologic procedures by graduates of Canadian urological programs is congruent with the objectives of training (OTR) put forward by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC).

Methods: The Canadian T-Res (Resiliance Software Inc., Vancouver, BC) database for pediatric surgical procedures logged from 2003 to 2009 was interrogated. The number of cases logged for each of the A, B and C lists of procedures (least complex to most complex) as outlined in the RCPSC OTR in Urology were recorded for the 6 participating programs across the country.

Results: A total of 48 residents submitted data to T-Res from the 6 participating programs. Of the A-list procedures, Canadian urology residents (PGY 1-5) from the 6 participating programs participated in an annual average of 53 hypospadias repairs, 30 orchidopexies for inguinal testes, 26 circumcisions, 7 hernia/hydrocele repairs, 7 pyeloplasties, 7 ureteral reimplants, 6 endoscopic injections for vesicoureteral reflux, 3 meatoplasties/meatotomies, 1 transurethral incision of ureterocele, 2 endoscopic procedures for stone management, and 1 transurethral incision of ureterocele, during the years in question. Of the B-list procedures, residents participated in an annual average of 1 transurethral resection of a posterior urethral valve, 3 continent diversions, 2 augmentation cystoplasties and 1 vesicostomy. Of the data available for the C-list procedures, residents participated in an annual average of less than 1 exstrophy repair and less than 1 pediatric renal transplant.

Conclusions: The RCPSC objectives set out by the specialty committee are a useful framework for guiding graduating residents on which procedures they might reasonably perform once they enter practice. Ongoing revisions to these objectives, which reflect changing trends in the management of core pediatric urology procedures, are supported by our study based on the number of cases in which residents participate. Improvements in the assessment of trainee surgical experience and competence, as it relates to the objectives of training in pediatric urology, are required as we migrate towards a competency-based model of postgraduate medical education.

Published
2014-10-13
How to Cite
Gustafson, P., & MacNeily, A. (2014). Pediatric procedures in urology residency training: An analysis of the experience of Canadian urology residents. Canadian Urological Association Journal, 8(9-10), 317-20. https://doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.2004
Section
Original Research