Outpatient prescribing and prophylactic antibiotic use for recurrent urinary tract infections in British Columbia, Canada

Authors

  • Ariana Saatchi Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia
  • Ji Won Yoo Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia
  • Fawziah Marra Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.7162

Keywords:

Antimicrobial, Prescribing, Primary Care, Urinary Tract Infection, Epidemiology, Public Health

Abstract

Introduction: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the most common infections, have frequent recurrences, and may debilitate quality of life. UTI is considered recurrent if there are three individual cases of UTI within 12 months. The objective of this study was to set a baseline for recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTI) in women, and rUTI-associated antibiotic prescribing in the presence of antimicrobial stewardship efforts.

Methods: Data for rUTI in women were organized through a provincial prescription database, physician billing system, and a consolidation file to combine antibiotic prescribing, diagnoses and patient demographics. Rates of rUTI cases and prescriptions were examined, and trends of antibiotics were separated by major anatomical therapeutic chemical classes.

Results: A total of 2 234 903 rUTI-associated prescriptions were dispensed for 674 785 rUTI cases from 2008–2018; 2 205 703 prescriptions were for treatment and 29 310 prescriptions were for prophylaxis of rUTI. The prevalence of rUTI cases declined by 59%, while overall rUTI-associated antibiotic prescribing decreased by 73%. The greatest decrease was seen in quinolones (87%), while nitrofurantoin became the most common rUTI-antibiotic dispensed, accounting for 42% of prescriptions overall.

Conclusions: Implementation of numerous antimicrobial stewardship efforts may have contributed to the decrease in antibiotic prescribing, particularly for quinolones. In line with local antibiograms and guidelines, nitrofurantoin is the most used antibiotic for rUTI by far, distinctly preferred over other antibiotics secondary to the lack of E. coli resistance.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Ariana Saatchi, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia

4th year PhD Candidate under the supervision of Dr. Fawziah Lalji. Main research focus includes trends in antibiotic prescribing, inappropriate use and antimicrobial stewardship in British Columbia, Canada.

Ji Won Yoo, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia

A third year PharmD student with the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UBC. 

Fawziah Marra, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia

A professor in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at UBC and has practiced infectious diseases pharmacotherapy within both the acute care (hospital) sector and public health (BC Centre for Disease Control).

Published

2021-06-22

How to Cite

Saatchi, A., Yoo, J. W., & Marra, F. (2021). Outpatient prescribing and prophylactic antibiotic use for recurrent urinary tract infections in British Columbia, Canada. Canadian Urological Association Journal, 15(12). https://doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.7162

Issue

Section

Original Research