The impact of day of surgery on the length of stay for major urological procedures

Gregory J. Nason, Eabhann M. O'Connor, Cathleen O'Neill, Omer Izzeldin, Shane W. Considine, M. Frank O'Brien

Abstract


Introduction: Surgery performed later in the week has been associated with longer length of stay (LOS). The aim of this study was to assess if the day of the surgery impacted the LOS for two major urological procedures in a tertiary referral university teaching hospital.

Methods: A retrospective review was performed of two major urological procedures consecutively performed by a single surgeon in our unit from March 2012 to December 2015. Patient demographics, histopathological characteristics, operative details, and LOS were obtained from the patients’ medical records. Procedures performed on Monday or Tuesday were defined as early in the week and procedures performed on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday were defined as late in the week.

Results: During the study period, 140 open radical prostatectomy (ORP) and 42 open partial nephrectomy (OPN) procedures were performed. There was a significant difference in median LOS for major urological procedures performed early in the week compared to late in the week (3 [3‒4] days vs. 4 [4‒5] days; p= 0.0001). There was a significant difference in median LOS for ORP performed early in the week compared to late in the week (3 [3‒4] days vs. 4 [4‒5] days; p= 0.0004). There was a similar significant difference in OPN performed early in the week compared to late in the week (4 [3‒5.5] days vs. 5 [4‒5] days; p= 0.029).

Conclusions: The day of surgery impacts LOS for major urological procedures. Major procedures should be performed early in the week, when it is feasible to facilitate prompt safe discharge and better use of hospital resources.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.3777